A Day in Manila Post Office

I recently visited the Philippine Postal Office in Manila, to get my postal ID. The said ID, once claimed—would be considered a major identification card for various purposes, such as opening a bank account or getting a visa or a passport. Every city in the country has a satellite Post Office Branch, and in my case, I got to spend half a day there in the Manila Branch.

Let me share here my one-day experience in Manila’s post office, and guide you to basic things you should know, should you want to get your Postal ID, too.

A Day in Manila Post Office

I was told by my elder brother that the office usually opens up at 6 AM, so I ride a jeep to Quiapo by 6:30. Usually, the driver will pull around Lawton, so if you will ride in one you could just politely ask him to drop you off the Lawton. (Low-tohn)

A Day in Manila Post Office

I arrived at the post office at 7:30 AM, and I was advised by the guard to photocopy all my necessary documents. I didn’t have trouble finding a photocopying venue, as there is a little photocopying office situated on the left side of the building. After I furnished my copies, I waited for a couple of minutes, as we were told that counters are open to accommodate by the strike of 8 AM.

Anyway, here are the requirements you’d need to present in the office.

A Day in Manila Post Office

A Day in Manila Post Office

Once the counter opened, they asked us to fall in line. The checking of documents is pretty fast. The counter personnel will ask you to show the original copies of the following in the picture.  After collecting your documents, they will again ask you to wait to be called. At this period, they will give you a certain Phil Post form to fill up. In my case, I already had a printed form with me, one I downloaded online. It took me about one and a half hour before I hear my name again.

A Day in Manila Post Office

Unlike other offices, Post Office doesn’t practice a lunch break among their employees, so as not to delay applicant’s assistance. There is a lunch break, alright—but they find a way to assign people to fill in someone’s place while on the break. By the time I was called, I was asked to pay 504 pesos ($9.93) for the transaction.

The counter lady told me that the ID will be released for about 2-3 weeks. It will be delivered,  and she advised me to leave an authorization letter at home, in chances that I might be away when the delivery arrives.

A Day in Manila Post Office

The next step in the process was to verify the details in my documents, and the photo shoot thing. It was a long line, people beside me were gushing in annoyance, but aside from that, nothing had stopped us from getting “captured”, as how most people around used to call the process. I was number 38 on the line.

A Day in Manila Post Office

A Day in Manila Post Office

Upon calling my number, I was asked to verify the information written in my sheets, if they are right: from the spelling and numbers.  They verify it once more, and after giving my copy of a receipt, they let me go. Basically, that’s it. The only thing that has bugged me so much was the waiting time I had spent through the whole process.

A Day in Manila Post Office

One final post-thought.

If you wish to get your Postal ID at any city you are staying, I advised you to allot a half-day time on your schedule for the whole application process. As for me, I happen to come across a long line, and the time I got out was merely around 2 in the afternoon. Some offices are open during weekends, but only assists applicants within limited hours. Before going to the nearest post office in your area, make sure to have the necessary documents and proof of identity, so as to not waste time skipping one process stage to another.

Manila’s Post Office is a one, big office everyone goes to furnish everything concerning messages, documents, and identifications in a quality identification service throughout decades.

Read more: Accommodation in the Philippines

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